No Reservations – Remote Access Trojan Pilfers Credit Cards from Hotels

Our intelligence center researchers recently uncovered a fraud “package” being sold in underground forums that uses a remote access Trojan to steal credit card information from a hotel point of sale (PoS) application. This scheme, which is focused on the hospitality industry, illustrates how criminals are planting malware on enterprise machines to collect financial information instead of targeting end users devices.

In this particular scenario, a remote access Trojan program is used to infect hotel front desk computers. The malware is able to steal credit card and other customer information by capturing screenshots from the PoS application. According the seller, the Trojan is guaranteed not to be detected by anti-virus programs.

No reservations

This fraud package is being offered for $280. The purchase price includes instructions on how to set-up the Trojan. The sellers even offer advice on how to use telephone social engineering techniques via VoIP software to trick front desk managers into installing the Trojan.

To prove the effectiveness of the fraud package, the seller uses a screenshot (above) taken by the remote access Trojan from the PoS system at one of the world’s largest hotel chains. The screenshot shows the PoS application populated with customer information gathered at check-in.

As we have mentioned in recent posts, criminals are increasingly expanding the focus of their attacks from online banking targets to enterprises. One of the reasons for this shift is that enterprise devices can yield high value digital assets when compromised.

Source: No Reservations – Remote Access Trojan Pilfers Credit Cards from Hotels


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Android malware poses as Angry Birds Space game

Angry Birds Space Android malware authors have seized an opportunity to infect unsuspecting smartphone users with the launch of the latest addition to the immensely popular “Angry Birds” series of games.

SophosLabs recently encountered malware-infected editions of the “Angry Birds Space” game which have been placed in unofficial Android app stores. Please note: The version of “Angry Birds Space” in the official Android market (recently renamed “Google Play”) is *not* affected.

The Trojan horse, which Sophos detects as Andr/KongFu-L, appears to be a fully-functional version of the popular smartphone game, but uses the GingerBreak exploit to gain root access to the device, and install malicious code.
The Trojan communicates with a remote website in an attempt to download and install further malware onto the compromised Android smartphone.

Android phone with Trojan posing as Angry Birds Space

Interestingly, the malware hides its payload – in the form of two malicious ELF files – at the end of a JPG image file.

Hidden code at end of JPG file

With the malware in place, cybercriminals can now send compromised Android devices instructions to download further code or push URLs to be displayed in the smartphone’s browser.

Effectively, your Android phone is now part of a botnet, under the control of malicious hackers.

It feels like we have to keep reminding Android users to be on their guard against malware risks, and to be very careful – especially when downloading applications from unofficial Android markets.

Source: Android malware poses as Angry Birds Space game


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Law Enforcement Forensics Tools Against Smart Phones

Turns out the password can be easily bypassed:

XRY works by first jailbreaking the handset. According to Micro Systemation, no ‘backdoors’ created by Apple used, but instead it makes use of security flaws in the operating system the same way that regular jailbreakers do.

Once the iPhone has been jailbroken, the tool then goes on to ‘brute-force’ the passcode, trying every possible four digit combination until the correct password has been found. Given the limited number of possible combinations for a four-digit passcode — 10,000, ranging from 0000 to 9999 — this doesn’t take long.

Once the handset has been jailbroken and the passcode guessed, all the data on the handset, including call logs, messages, contacts, GPS data and even keystrokes, can be accessed and examined.

One of the morals is to use an eight-digit passcode.

Source: Law Enforcement Forensics Tools Against Smart Phones


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