Posts Categorized: Bruce Schneier

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    WhatsApp Security Vulnerability

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    Back in March, Rolf Weber wrote about a potential vulnerability in the WhatsApp protocol that would allow Facebook to defeat perfect forward secrecy by forcibly change users’ keys, allowing it — or more likely, the government — to eavesdrop on encrypted messages. It seems that this vulnerability is real: WhatsApp has the ability to force… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    Hacking Your Computer Monitor

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    Here’s an interesting hack against a computer’s monitor: A group of researchers has found a way to hack directly into the tiny computer that controls your monitor without getting into your actual computer, and both see the pixels displayed on the monitor — effectively spying on you — and also manipulate the pixels to display… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    Cheating in Marathon Running

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    Story of Julie Miller, who cheated in multiple triathlon races: The difference between cheating in 1980 and cheating today is that it’s much harder to get away with now. What trips up contemporary cheaters, Empfield said, is their false assumption that the only thing they have to worry about is their timing chip, the device… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    The Fundamental Insecurity of USB

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    p>This is pretty impressive: Most of us learned long ago not to run executable files from sketchy USB sticks. But old-fashioned USB hygiene can’t stop this newer flavor of infection: Even if users are aware of the potential for attacks, ensuring that their USB’s firmware hasn’t been tampered with is nearly impossible. The devices don’t… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    iPhone Sensor Surveillance

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    The new iPhone has a motion sensor chip, and that opens up new opportunities for surveillance: The M7 coprocessors introduce functionality that some may instinctively identify as “creepy.” Even Apple’s own description hints at eerie omniscience: “M7 knows when you’re walking, running, or even driving…” While it’s quietly implemented within iOS, it’s not secret for… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    Law Enforcement Forensics Tools Against Smart Phones

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    Turns out the password can be easily bypassed: XRY works by first jailbreaking the handset. According to Micro Systemation, no ‘backdoors’ created by Apple used, but instead it makes use of security flaws in the operating system the same way that regular jailbreakers do. Once the iPhone has been jailbroken, the tool then goes on… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    Hacking Apple Laptop Batteries

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    Interesting: Security researcher Charlie Miller, widely known for his work on Mac OS X and Apple’s iOS, has discovered an interesting method that enables him to completely disable the batteries on Apple laptops, making them permanently unusable, and perform a number of other unintended actions. The method, which involves accessing and sending instructions to the… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    ShareMeNot

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    ShareMeNot is a Firefox add-on for preventing tracking from third-party buttons (like the Facebook “Like” button or the Google “+1” button) until the user actually chooses to interact with them. That is, ShareMeNot doesn’t disable/remove these buttons completely. Rather, it allows them to render on the page, but prevents the cookies from being sent until… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    RFID Tags Protecting Hotel Towels

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    The stealing of hotel towels isn’t a big problem in the scheme of world problems, but it can be expensive for hotels. Sure, we have moral prohibitions against stealing — that’ll prevent most people from stealing the towels. Many hotels put their name or logo on the towels. That works as a reputational societal security… Read more »

  • Bruce Schneier, English-Italian Translations

    Forged Memory

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    A scary development in rootkits: Rootkits typically modify certain areas in the memory of the running operating system (OS) to hijack execution control from the OS. Doing so forces the OS to present inaccurate results to detection software (anti-virus, anti-rootkit). For example rootkits may hide files, registries, processes, etc., from detection software. So rootkits typically… Read more »